Posted 7 hours ago
Posted 7 hours ago

denisforkas:

Satan, a character study for John Milton’s Paradise Lost, 2012

Graphite and watercolour on paper, 29.5 x 17 cm

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago

whowasntthere:

dendroica:

Rainbow Scarab, face1, silver spring, md_2013-12-31-14.48.26 ZS PMax Panorama2 by Sam Droege on Flickr.

Experimental Shot. One of the problems with macro photography is that sometimes your subject is too big. In this case this lovely very large scarab beetle would not fit in the field of view of my MPE65. I could switch to a 100mm lens but I would then lose a lot of lovely detail. Fortunately I have just purchased a nice cast iron laboratory jack stand which lets me raise and lower the specimens using a knob rather than re-positioning them. For this shot I took 3 sets of stacked shots and then stitched them together in PTGui. Very quick and dirty and if you look close you can see 2 areas where the join was imperfect, but it has a lot of promise. This version is 7000 and some pixels on the long side and there is no reason I can’t stitch together an entire monster beetle. If one had the proper plotter you would then create a photograph several feet on a side.

This is Phanaeus vindex brought into the lab by my High School buddy now entomologist Wayne White, found in a swimming pool drain in Silver Spring Maryland.

Fuzzy cutey!

Posted 1 week ago

thecoolestanimalblog:

Velvet worms arent actual worms.. They are invertebrates from phylum Onychophora. Velvet worms come in different colors, and they spit slime to hunt their prey.

Posted 1 week ago
libutron:

Parazoanthus axinellae | ©João Pedro Silva   (Paredes do Cabo, Sesimbra, Portugal)
Parazoanthus axinellae is a Mediterranean zoanthid coral (an animal and not a flower), always associated in colonies, measuring up to 4 cm. Individuals are yellow sharp with orange, and has 34 tentacles laid out in double crown [source].
Animalia - Cnidaria - Anthozoa - Zoantharia - Zoanthidea - Parazoanthidae - Parazoanthus - P. axinellae

libutron:

Parazoanthus axinellae | ©João Pedro Silva   (Paredes do Cabo, Sesimbra, Portugal)

Parazoanthus axinellae is a Mediterranean zoanthid coral (an animal and not a flower), always associated in colonies, measuring up to 4 cm. Individuals are yellow sharp with orange, and has 34 tentacles laid out in double crown [source].

Animalia - Cnidaria - Anthozoa - Zoantharia - Zoanthidea - Parazoanthidae - ParazoanthusP. axinellae

Posted 1 week ago

moschops911:

Ichthyosaurus acutirostris with ammonites, Harpoceras falcifer

Posted 1 week ago

adventuresintimeandspace:

Here are some scientific facts about blood loss for all you psychopaths writers out there.

I shall now be super judgy about blood loss in future readings >_>

Posted 1 week ago

fuckyeahmineralogy:

Dioptase; Tsumeb Mine, Otjikoto Region, Namibia

Posted 1 week ago
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Newton’s third law says that forces come in equal and opposite pairs. This means that when air exerts lift on an airplane, the airplane also exerts a downward force on the air. This is clear in the image above, which shows a an A380 prototype launched through a wall of smoke. When the model passes, air is pushed downward. The finite size of the wings also generates dramatic wingtip vortices. The high pressure air on the underside of the wings tries to slip around the wingtip to the upper surface, where the local pressure is low. This generates the spiraling vortices, which can be a significant hazard to other nearby aircraft. They are also detrimental to the airplane’s lift because they reduce the downwash of air. Most commercial aircraft today mitigate these effects using winglets which weaken the vortices’ effects. (Image credit: Nat. Geo./BBC2)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Newton’s third law says that forces come in equal and opposite pairs. This means that when air exerts lift on an airplane, the airplane also exerts a downward force on the air. This is clear in the image above, which shows a an A380 prototype launched through a wall of smoke. When the model passes, air is pushed downward. The finite size of the wings also generates dramatic wingtip vortices. The high pressure air on the underside of the wings tries to slip around the wingtip to the upper surface, where the local pressure is low. This generates the spiraling vortices, which can be a significant hazard to other nearby aircraft. They are also detrimental to the airplane’s lift because they reduce the downwash of air. Most commercial aircraft today mitigate these effects using winglets which weaken the vortices’ effects. (Image credit: Nat. Geo./BBC2)

Posted 1 week ago

WHEN I DON’T KNOW A JAPANESE WORD SO I SAY IT IN ENGLISH WITH A JAPANESE ACCENT

ijustcanttoday:

image

DAMN STRAIGHT

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

ask-team-rush:

youngparis:

Cocoon and Evolved Metallic Mechanitis Butterfly Chrysalis from Costa Rica

Posted 1 week ago

WHEN CHILDREN ARE STARING AT ME ON THE TRAIN

ijustcanttoday:

image

Posted 1 week ago

anonynaila:

subvertcliche:

mello-dramatic:

Everyone who reblogs this will get the title of a book to read based on their bio/posts.

Everyone. I mean it.

THIS IS THE BEST POST

I HAVE EVER SEEN

EVER

they really do mean everyone