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traddmoore:

UNDERTOW

Here’s a pin-up for Steve Orlando and Artyom Trakhanov’s UNDERTOW Vol 1. - Boatman’s Call trade paperback, out through Image Comics in September.

Make sure to tell your local comic shop to order copies
(Diamond Order code: JUL140518)

and/or

Preorder it on AMAZON now (Avail. Sept. 30, 2014)


For those of you who haven’t checked out the comic yet, I highly recommend that you do. TPB, single issues, digital, whatever method you prefer, just get it! Artyom ( ohotnig ) is an outstandingly talented artist; you’re going to want to keep your eyes on this dude and dig into his incredible work. Follow Artyom, follow Steve, and get your hands on UNDERTOW!

(Also, milonogiannis and I must think along the same lines, because we essentially drew the same pin-up for this comic, haha. My bad, Giannis! Check out his awesome pin-up piece too!)

Posted 2 hours ago
Posted 3 hours ago
libutron:

Anatase crystal | ©National Museum Wales 
Anatase is one of the five forms of titanium dioxide found in nature. Anatase crystals are translucent, brown, pale yellow, reddish brown, indigo, black, pale green, pale lilac, grey, rarely nearly colorless, brown, yellow-brown, or pale green.
Reference: [1]

libutron:

Anatase crystal | ©National Museum Wales 

Anatase is one of the five forms of titanium dioxide found in nature. Anatase crystals are translucent, brown, pale yellow, reddish brown, indigo, black, pale green, pale lilac, grey, rarely nearly colorless, brown, yellow-brown, or pale green.

Reference: [1]

Posted 3 hours ago
libutron:

Puffball Lycoperdon sp. releasing spores
Spore discharge from puff-balls of the Lycoperdon type (Agaricaceae) can be brought about by impact of water drops on the flattened papery top of the endoperidium (the inner of the two layers into which the sack that encloses a mass of spores is divided).
Raindrops of 1 mm. diameter or over, and rain-drip from trees are adequate to operate the mechanism. Analysis of the operation by ultra-high-speed photographs have shown that the puff reaches a height of a centimeter in approximately one-hundredth of a second after impact. The velocity of the puff on emerging from the ostiole (aperture) is of the order of 100 cm/sec.
The endoperidium (sack) is normally water-proof and ejection continues under humid conditions. Estimates, made from meteorological data, show that a fruit body must be operated many thousands of times in a season. 
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Marco Bertolini | Locality: unknown

libutron:

Puffball Lycoperdon sp. releasing spores

Spore discharge from puff-balls of the Lycoperdon type (Agaricaceae) can be brought about by impact of water drops on the flattened papery top of the endoperidium (the inner of the two layers into which the sack that encloses a mass of spores is divided).

Raindrops of 1 mm. diameter or over, and rain-drip from trees are adequate to operate the mechanism. Analysis of the operation by ultra-high-speed photographs have shown that the puff reaches a height of a centimeter in approximately one-hundredth of a second after impact. The velocity of the puff on emerging from the ostiole (aperture) is of the order of 100 cm/sec.

The endoperidium (sack) is normally water-proof and ejection continues under humid conditions. Estimates, made from meteorological data, show that a fruit body must be operated many thousands of times in a season. 

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Marco Bertolini | Locality: unknown

Posted 4 hours ago

libutron:

Rhodochrosite with Minor cubic purple Fluorite and “needle” Quartz crystals on sulfide matrix | ©Xiao-dong Xu

Sweet Home mine, near Alma, Park County, Colorado, US.

The Rhodochrosite, a member of the Calcite Group, may be pink, red, yellowish-grey, brown, white, and gray; however, red forms occur when the mineral is purer and has minimal iron content.

Reference: [1]

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blamoscience:

The Eye of the Sahara, seen here in an aerial image provided by the ISS, is is a prominent circular feature in the Sahara desert near Ouadane, west–central Mauritania. It was initially thought to have been caused by a meteor impact, but lack of strong evidence has turned many off to this hypothesis. At 30 miles wide (50 km) it is easily visible from space.

Posted 17 hours ago

iamjapanese:

Keigetsu Matsubayashi(松林桂月 Japanese, 1876-1963)

Shunsho-Kaei 2 春宵花影図 2  1939

Posted 23 hours ago

libutron:

Orange pore fungus: an invasive species 

When speaking of invasive organisms is common to think of plants and animals, but not in fungus, perhaps because there are few studies that address the issue of geographic dispersal in this group of organisms. 

The fact is that fungi can also be dispersed, as they have a medium, their spores, through which the genetic material of the fungus can be taken to new places and successfully establish, whether be it transported by natural elements (water, wind, birds) or accidentally by man.

The beautiful Orange pore fungus, Favolaschia calocera (Mycenaceae), is one of those fungi that has spread beyond its native range distribution. This saprotrophic fungus occurs naturally in Madagascar and parts of southern Asia. It was first reported as an exotic New Zealand in the 1950s, and is now common throughout the North Island and the north western regions of the South Island.

Genetic studies also revealed that it may have also been introduced to Kenya, Norfolk Island and Réunion Island. In 2002 it was also reported from Italy. In 2005 it was recorded for the first time in south eastern Australia, and currently it has been reported also in North America (Brazil) and the Hawaiian islands.

Because it is spreading, it needs to be monitored due to the potential ecological impacts of its introduction, since it is a saprotrophic fungi. Whether it may displace native fungi is still uncertain, as in both New Zealand and Italy it appears to be more abundant in remnant or disturbed habitats.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Bernard Spragg | Locality: Ruakaka, Northland, New Zealand]  -  [Bottom: ©Marco Bertolini | Locality: unknown]

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago

realmonstrosities:

A giant, spiky springtail!

Most springtails are only a few millimetres long, but this one is more than 1 cm.

It’s like a big, cuddly bear! With spikes and bristles.

…Images: Andy Murray